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PUBLIC FACILITIES :: SEWER
 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF WASTEWATER SYSTEM
The City of Wolf Point through the City Council is responsible for the operation of the publicly owned wastewater collection and treatment facilities serving the City. The Fort Peck Tribe owns much of the land outside of the City including the lagoon site. The City leases this property from the Fort Peck Tribes.
 
TREATMENT FACILITY (Lagoon)

Photo of lagoonThe existing wastewater treatment system is a result of modifying the original 1956 single cell facultative lagoon by splitting it into two cells and installing a surface aeration system in the first cell. This 1987 retrofit was not very effective due to a number of reasons among them the lack of operating depth, high degree of failure among the motors on the aerators and the sludge build up was causing a problem with the detention time in the second cell. In 1995, the in slopes of the two cells were changed from 7:1 to 3:1 slopes and erosion control blankets were installed. This project was funded through a low interest loan through the Montana State Revolving Fund (SRF) program. In 2000, the City purchased wind powered floating aeration-mixer units (pond doctors) and installed them in both cells.

The facility is a source of locally unacceptable odors at certain times of the year. The variable depth of sludge in the second cell creates pockets of sewage that cannot move or circulate which creates a localized septic condition, which increases the odor problems. This is apparent during the fall and spring turnovers. This problem is further emphasized due to the lack of separation between the lagoon and a developed housing area less than 500 feet north of the lagoon.

Photo of water systemIn 2001, the City drained the first cell and removed approximately 3 ½-4 feet of sludge that had built up in that cell. This was Phase I of a three phase project. The old surface aerators were re-installed and the first cell was put back into operation. During the spring turn over in 2002, there was still the odor problem. Phase II involved the removal of the sludge from the secondary cell and the addition of a cross dike within the secondary cell to create a second primary (storage) cell along with an improved aeration system.

In 2004, the Phase III project created two (2) 7 acre cells that are 15’ deep and have a subsurface aeration system installed. The improvements include a new aeration building and improved piping to allow flexibility to treat the waste water. This project was funded through a low interest loan through U.S.D.A. Rural Development loan program/TSEP grant program, city funds and a grant from the Fort Peck Housing Authority.

 
COLLECTION SYSTEM
The City’s wastewater collection system includes 2 sewer lift stations, over 200 manholes, and about 15 miles of sewer lines. There are presently 4,000 customers connected with the city’s wastewater facilities. Those customers discharged into the city’s treatment works 146 million gallons of wastewater during fiscal year 2006.
 
DISPOSAL SYSTEM

Under the Montana Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (MPDES) permit, the city is required to provide secondary treatment to all collected wastewater prior to discharging it into the Missouri River for disposal, as well as meet the MPDES requirements for fecal coliform bacteria, pH, grease, total chlorine residual and effluent toxicity.

The Missouri River, the receiving stream for the existing wastewater discharge, has been assigned a 3C water use classification by the State. This classification required that the river be maintained suitable for potable (drinking), culinary and food processing purposes after conventional treatment; for swimming and recreation; for growth and propagation of non-salmonid (trout) fishes and associated aquatic life; waterfowl and furbearer; and agricultural and industrial water supply. Several downstream communities utilize the Missouri River as a source of domestic water after treatment.

 
SEWER RATES

All sewer accounts are billed an administrative rate as either a residential or commercial accounts. The rate also contains a debt service charge and an operating and maintenance fee. Residential sewer charges are based upon the average monthly water usage during a 6 month period (November through April) and are re-averaged each May. The commercial sewer charge is based upon each accounts monthly water usage.

RATE RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Administrative Rate $ 7.76 $ 9.26
Debt Service Rate $ 6.02 $ 6.02
Operation & Maintenance Rate $2.00 p/1000 gals $2.00 p/1000 gals
Rates: Effective August 15, 2005
SEWER FEES
Refer to Water Fees.
     
OPPORTUNITY FEES
Opportunity fees are required for hookups to properties where service has not been provided. See office for details.
 
CONTACT:

Ward Smith
Water/Wastewater Supervisor

201 4th Avenue South
Wolf Point MT 59201
Phone: 406-653-1852
FAX: 406-653-3240
e-mail address: wpshop@nemont.net

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CITY OF WOLF POINT, MONTANA
201 4th Avenue South :: Wolf Point, MT 59201
Phone: 406-653-1852
FAX: 406-653-3240
E-mail: ctywlfpt@nemont.net

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